rinapiccolo.com
ImageFirstBlogPost.jpg

Rina Piccolo Blog

Rina Piccolo's Blog is about cartooning, comics, illustration, and creativity.

For more of my RHYMES WITH ORANGE Guest spot cartoons clink HERE...

For more of my RHYMES WITH ORANGE Guest spot cartoons clink HERE...

Drawings That Move, Wooden Paper, and More...

My friend, the cartoonist Susan Camilleri Konar, sent me a pretty cool gift that I sort of don't know how to use: a pad of wooden paper.

After some experimentation with the "paper", I was able to determine how it would behave with ink, ink wash, and other materials. (Ink lines made with pens and dip pens tend to feather and bleed a little, but not enough to be annoying. Ink with a brush feathers less than with a pen, or nib. It takes ink washes and watercolours nicely, but buckles a lot if it's too wet. Pencil crayons work nicely too, especially water-soluble ones.)

Here's the drawing I made after experimenting. As you can see, I decided to go with the grain of the wood, and let the tree itself "inform me" on what to draw. 

Drawing on wooden sheets of "paper"... above the drawing is a sample sheet. See the grain of the wood?

Drawing on wooden sheets of "paper"... above the drawing is a sample sheet. See the grain of the wood?

The interesting thing about wooden paper is its history. Without delving too much into it, you'll be happy to know that this unusual type of paper is created using trees harvested as part of an ecological process that promotes new growth, and healthy sustainable forests in Japan, which is where the paper has its origin. (Geez, why do so many awesome art supplies come from Japan? I must visit someday.)

Moving on to other work, I made a couple of "motion drawings", drawings that move:

 

This first one, titled "Doing Laundry" was drawn in Procreate (using the Apple Pencil), and then animated in Sketchbook Motion -- the best and only app for kinetic motion. (I was a beta-tester for this app, which was formerly known as "Draco". I love it.)

This next motion drawing below, titled "Sky And Sea," was drawn traditionally (Ink, graphite, and watercolour on illustration board), and then animated in Sketchbook Motion.

 

Lastly, here's a line drawing that I made on Yupo paper. Yupo paper, if you don't already know of it, is plastic paper, made from polyester fibres. It's pretty nice to draw on. However I wouldn't use it with wet media. Well, hey, isn't that funny, in all of my planning for this blog post, it's only now that I realize that I went from drawing on wood to drawing on plastic in a heartbeat. It just goes to show you, drawings can exist on nearly any surface that we can imagine.

Thanks for readin' n' lookin'... please share!

Don't forget to check out: "Musings on Keeping a Sketchbook Journal" and "5 Killer Mistakes Beginner Cartoonists Make"

 

 

Line Ink drawing on Yupo paper (paper made with plastic fibres).

Line Ink drawing on Yupo paper (paper made with plastic fibres).